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Poster: Reade Date: Jun 11, 2014 9:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: tuning and knoodling

"But their very human side, and lack of any real showbiz instinct was endearing."

Very well put DD.
I remember being blown away in high school (glam-rock, makeup and one-piece jumpsuits were king at the time) the way these guys would come out in jeans and T Shirts. I'm not sure younger fans today properly understand just how against-the-grain these guys were at the time (early seventies) in terms of rock acts.
Yes Jerry was neurotic about tuning- but the more or less complete acceptance of it by the fanbase I always thought was part of what made the whole scene special. Traditional show business values and formulas were just completely out the window here. Same with the whole Phil-singing-thing. What was so endearing was the band and their fan base were each just so freaking bent that there were very few rules. Which appealed mightily to my adolescent sensibilities. (Then and now (<;)

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jun 11, 2014 10:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: tuning and knoodling

Bob tried to interject some ... well I guess he though it was showbiz style into the shows . I believe somewhere in the Taper's Compendium 2, this was described as "Bob the happy cheese man" . His attempts are so corny that THEY are sort of endearing . I recall a quote form an article posted here a while ago, describing their appeal , "Jerry was so uncool, he was cool" .
I had a non-Dead fan friend form Tower, and she had been taken to see one of the JGB shows . She was not impressed . "He just sat there like a big lump" .
I could have said a lot of things about it being music, the show is yourself, look and a lll the crazy people around you , you wanted him to be like Kiss?... but some people expect a "show", and some a concert .

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Poster: Reade Date: Jun 11, 2014 11:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: tuning and knoodling

The Dead passed through town my junior year in high school and the music reviewer for the school paper- a senior - attended. He was a big man on campus- he had a girl friend and everything. He boned them really bad in his review and the line I remember verbatim: "They just stood there!" This was the era of David Bowie and Alice Cooper and Rock as Theatre and all that other shit.
I thought hell, that's what I actually like about those guys! They were serving the music in a kind of blue collar fashion- keeping front and center what was important, and what was not. THAT to me was the epitome of professionalism- having your priorities in order. So what if they were weirdos about tuning or weren't the greatest singers?